Bridge open

Detour no longer needed

The bridge over Cherry Creek on FM 2836 was reopened last week after being closed since March for replacement. The $1.45 million project was completed by Scott Tucker Construction Company, LLC, out of Fort Worth.

Practices being Aug. 1st

Volleyball, cross-country, football...

High school athletes begin practices Mon., Aug. 1st. For a complete list of times, places and necessities, see this week's edition of the Record.

Riders return for a visit

Run for the Wall donation...

Three bikers that participate in Run for the Wall came to Colorado City last week to present a $4,000 to Colorado Middle School. The men said they love the stop here, because they are so well supported by the community and the kids.

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  • The City of Colorado City is about to be the proud owner of an animal shelter, and Animal Control Officer Rustine Lendermon came to Lions Club on Friday to tell club members all about it.A temporary animal shelter is expected to open on September 1st in the round metal building across the street from Mi Ranchito that was once used as a city maintenance barn. Lendermon said that citizens have been ...
  • The lights will be shining at the Mitchell County Sports Complex this week, as a state baseball tournament is underway. Everyone is welcome to come out and catch some good baseball action.The 12 Year Tight Base division of the local youth baseball league is the division playing in the tournament. Organizers are hoping that local baseball fans will come out and show their support for the teams who ...
  • One of the largest groups in recent years gathered on Saturday for the 50th Spade Reunion. There was a pavilion and flag pole dedication at the Spade Cemetery, and the group moved into town to enjoy a lot of family genealogy, visiting, a catered lunch and business meeting.LeeAnn Moore Kuhel was one of the organizers of the event, and she said she was thrilled with the attendance of over 65 people....

Remembering Spade...

patsy with timelineOne of the largest groups in recent years gathered on Saturday for the 50th Spade Reunion. There was a pavilion and flag pole dedication at the Spade Cemetery, and the group moved into town to enjoy a lot of family genealogy, visiting, a catered lunch and business meeting.
LeeAnn Moore Kuhel was one of the organizers of the event, and she said she was thrilled with the attendance of over 65 people. The day started at the Spade Cemetery, located near the Spade Community, which is not the same thing, but the community was named after the ranch.
Kuhel said founding families of the reunion in 1966 were Minnie Lee and the late Tom Moore and the late Ross and Mamie Hargrove. Minnie Lee will turn 99 in August.
A brief dedication ceremony for a pavilion and flag pole was led by Russell Logan, a descendant of one of the Spade pioneer families, to start the reunion off on the right foot. Logan’s mom, grandparents and great-grandparents are buried in the cemetery.
Logan played the violin for a crowd of about 50 as part of the ceremony. He said the pavilion was dedicated for use by future generations of Spade descendants. The pavilion features an original pew from the Spade Methodist Church.
Tanner Cox and his sister, Sarah Ann Cox Kuss, donated a commercial flagpole which is a nice addition to the place. Over the years, three benches have also been added at the cemetery. Attendants enjoyed the chance to look through the markers and headstones of Spade Community members.
As the celebration progressed to the activity building of the First Baptist Church in Colorado City, descendants entered the building to find many family trees posted on the walls. The trees included names and photos of past and present Spade residents.
Kuhel performed genealogy studies on the pioneer families of Spade, and what resulted were many family trees containing 800 to 900 names. Those attending the reunion took a lot of time to look at the trees, and several remarked that they learned things about their own families as well as others they remember.
Two citizens of Mitchell County that were present for the first reunion in 1966 were also present for the 2016 reunion, Doris McClellan and Dorris Dockrey. Dockrey is also the citizen attending who lived at Spade the longest, 65 years. The farthest attendee traveled all the way from Colorado to take part in the event.
Due to low attendance of the reunion in the last several years, organizers were toying with the idea of the 2016 reunion being the last. That idea was swiftly overturned during the business meeting, but the format will change a bit. Kuhel said that next year’s reunion will be held in the spring and will be a picnic on the grounds.
Many of those attending the reunion no longer live in this area, but memories flooded the room as they reminisced. Patsy Hargrove Gipson of Abilene enjoyed the chance to learn about her own family.
“I’ve really enjoyed this,” she said. “I’ve met many family members I would have never known otherwise.”
Gipson’s great-great-grandfather, John L. Hargrove, buried one of his infant grandchildren in 1898 on a family plot which is now the cemetery. He was the second person to be buried there.
There were several local families represented at the reunion, including the Browne family that was represented by more than one tree due to the sheer size of the family.
Kuhel said she learned a lot as the genealogy study progressed. She learned many odd facts that she shared. Back in 1923, a huge tornado tore through the community and killed 50 people. The community was home to a couple of Swedish immigrants who came to west Texas straight from Sweden. Also, the worldwide flu epidemic of 1918-1919 took the lives of eight or nine Spade residents.
“It’s been really interesting,” Kuhel said. “It blows my mind how many families lived and managed to eek out a living on 200 acres.
Kuhel’s grandmother was a mid-wife in Spade, and she also prepared the dead for burial. She took care of critical influenza patients and would change clothes in the cold outside in order to protect her own family from the disease. Kuhel said that there were many things to learn as she studied families who pioneered Spade.
The 50th Spade Reunion was certainly something special this year. It’s no wonder that it’s a tradition that will be continued for years to come.

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